newborn awareness


We hear from practitioners about women whose goal it is to avoid a cesarean and have uninterrupted contact with her baby in the first hours of her baby’s emergence into our world.  It seems that these practitioners find it completely illogical for women to desire this goal because women are often out of it, exhausted, or undergoing surgery by the time second stage arrives.  In their experience, women are begging for epidurals, asking for c-sections, are completely unprepared for “the realities” of labor.  The practitioners are completely oblivious as to their role and influence in the outcome of the birth.  They are aware, though, that the public’s awareness of the need to question the application of protocols in general is on the rise.  Chaos ensues when the practitioner no longer takes on the responsibility of learning about normal birth, remaining current on research, does not hone his/her listening skills (read: bedside manner) and does not exercise patience, a critical element for a healthy birth outcome for both mother and her baby(ies).  How can we expect them to see they are the main contributing factor to what a laboring mother’s second and third stage will be?

It doesn’t strike practitioners as odd that they’ve come to believe and accept myths or oft-repeated misinformation as fact.  Peer research concludes the use of consensus in scientific matters is not infallible.  If the Michigan AMA Resolution 710 proposed above isn’t difficult enough for expectant mothers to fight their way through, there is also the medical birth community’s attempt at blaming mothers for dismal service results including the rising cesarean rate.   It seems mothers are darned if they do (they’re identified as hostile) and darned if they don’t (they’re asking to be cut open).

For example, back in the news again is a protocol that has not changed since last highlighted three years ago, but if it did revert back to its historically safe use has the power to change our country’s maternal and newborn statistics: pitocin.

Pit to distress” is the formal name of a protocol by which a mother is given pitocin to  either induce or speed up her labor at a rate that subsequently distresses the baby and leads to an automatic c-section.   Independent Childbirth member Jennifer Riedy explains the protocol on her blog and follows up in our post stating First…nurses (and doulas, and OB’s…and any type of care provider) need to realize that what happens in their area of practice is not the same as what happens in another area.  Even as a doula I see vastly different practices in two hospitals that are part of the same hospital system and located only 20 minutes drive from each other.  If a particular hospital has implemented guidelines to avoid “Pit to distress” that is great.  But don’t fall into the trap of believing that it isn’t happening (in another L&D room).

Just because it isn’t *called* “Pit to distress” does not mean that isn’t what is done.  If an order is given to put a woman on a certain dose of Pitocin, then up that dose every 15 minutes up to some maximum dose, then the unwritten part of the order is “or until the baby shows signs of distress.”

…Bottom line, the package insert says to start the Pit at 0.5-1 microunit per minute, and raise at 1-2 microunit per minute increments every 30 to 60 minutes.  More aggressive protocols raising the drip rate every 15 minutes –even if it is using those same doses–also put a mother and baby at the risk of being “Pit to distress” because it takes over 30 minutes for the Pitocin to equilibate, so while baby may tolerate well the dose that was set at noon, you will not really know that until after 12:30, and if the dose was raised at 12:15 and 12:30…you may have hit the “distress point” with the 12:15 dose.”

There are other mothers who will tell you they experienced pitocin at levels that they instinctively knew were not right for their bodies because their bodies were not only in pain their bodies were also signaling signs of fight or flight response.  They begged to have the pitocin turned off, only to have practitioners refuse to document their request and outright deny it as well.   A Rockville General (hospital) doctor in Connecticut was cited by one such mom when she birthed there in 2007.  She went on to share that the practitioner believed her mother was trying to influence her decision to ask for the pitocin to be turned off and attempted to remove her mother from the birth room (labelled hostile perhaps?).  Another doctor at UConn in Connecticut has stated that he is known for having the most aggressive pitocin protocol and achieving more vaginal births that way.  But, at what cost?  Certainly we were present for one such birth where a mother experienced an adverse pitocin reaction and rather than document it as such her files were noted that she refused pitocin.  Incidentally this same doctor is infamous for telling mothers who desire a natural birth that “80% of women ask for epidurals” (could that be because of the pitocin rate you employ???).  This is not an indictment of UConn, where we have also been present for healthy natural childbirth experiences with other doctors.  It is to exemplify the need for mothers to research their practitioner options and to confirm Jennifer’s observations that two vastly different scenarios can take place in the same hospital!

Jennifer Riedy’s well researched conclusions on the use and abuse of pitocin being common are backed up by the medical community as well.  Doctors Gary Ventolini and Ran Neiger state (Contemporary OBGyn; Sept 2004): “Oxytocin is also abused when one attempts to induce labor, especially in patients with unfavorable uterine cervix, and ‘induction failure’ is diagnosed shortly thereafter, before the onset of active labor.  We feel that as long as the fetal condition is reassuring cervical ripening should precede labor induction.  Once labor induction has begun, don’t abandon it in favor of a (cesarean) delivery before the cervix has started changing only because a set length of time has elapsed.”

On the subject of routine induction at 41 weeks as another example, there are also practitioners who see the fallacy of consensus in the medical community, specifically from practitioners Leung and Lao of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Queen Mary Hospital, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China (Routine induction of labour at 41 weeks of gestation: “nonsensus consensus”; BJOG Volume 109, Issue 12, Dec 2002):

Sir,

We read with great interest the commentary by Menticoglou and Hall published in May 2002 and want to echo the point of increasing caesarean section rate as a result of this nonsensus consensus. Our unit has adopted the practice of routine induction of labour at 41 weeks of gestation for several years on the basis of the findings of the Cochrane Review1, which suggested that this approach can reduce perinatal mortality. Women are admitted to the hospital at 41 weeks of gestation for cervical assessment with the Bishop’s score and induction of labour.  If the cervix is favourable, combined induction of labour with
artificial rupture of membranes and oxytocin infusion is performed on the following morning. If the cervix is unfavourable, a vaginal prostaglandin E2 3-mg tablet is used to prime the cervix. Combined induction is performed on the following morning if the cervix becomes favourable. If not, another dose of vaginal prostaglandin is given and induction is delayed for another day. In the case of labour occurring after cervical priming with vaginal prostaglandin, it is counted as induction of labour.

We have analysed the caesarean section rate for nulliparae undergoing induction of labour at 41 weeks of gestation from our hospital obstetric database. In the year 2000, 183 nulliparous women were induced under this consensus and 59 of them (32.2%) had caesarean sections. This caesarean section rate was significantly higher than that for term,
singleton, vertex presenting fetuses in nulliparous women in the same year (excluding those 183 women with induction at 41 weeks), which was 368/2271 or 16.2% ( 2 test, P < 0.0001). More alarming is that the caesarean section rate for nulliparous women undergoing induction of labour at 41 weeks of gestation increased even further to 35.0%
(63/180) in the year 2001 and 41.1% (23/56) in the current year (January to May).

We agree with the authors that it is now time to reconsider the consensus on routine induction of labour at 41 weeks of gestation, particularly in nulliparous women.

Reference
1. Crowley P. Interventions for preventing or improving the outcome
of delivery at or beyond term [Cochrane review]. The Cochrane Library,
1. Oxford: Update Software, 2002.

Simply put, you can’t get there (a normal second and third stage) from here (a medically managed first stage) without hitting a whole lot of long shots along the way.   We’ve read the book many times and the ending never changes.  Straightforwardly put, neither medical model practitioners nor mothers will ever know how different a birth experience might have been, and that has reverberations throughout a mother’s  lifetime and her baby’s lifetime.

The responsibility for knowing normal birth truly lies with mothers today as the majority of practitioners cannot get out of their own way in preventing injury to mothers and their babies.  You can, however, keep them out of your way.  Learn from the experts: other normal birth experienced support resources. The educated mother can choose her practitioner wisely and ‘get there.’

Many women choose a hospital for their first birth and talk about a home or birth center birth for the NEXT birth.  The slimmest thread firmly wound through a decades-long tapestry promoting hospital birth equates with a safe birth has effectively sewn up a veil of secrecy: home birth is not only safe, it is an inherited treasure.  A hospital birth for the normal, healthy woman (of which most of us are) denies a woman her birthright, to welcome her new family among family.  

I usually talk in my classes about how “this” is the *only* chance you’re going to get to birth *this* baby.  Sure you may go on to have other babies, but you only get *THIS* chance to birth *THIS* baby.  I also share with moms that because of this fact, the significance of this birth is infinitely greater than the significance of this birth is to your nurse, OB, midwife, etc. – Louise Delaney

So, what if our first birth is based on a myth: that hospital birth is ‘safer’?

I think there are some who choose to not deal with the reality that we tell them about, or choose not to believe that things can go so terribly awry iatrogenically because, after all, the doctors are only out to help us. When a traumatic birth does happen I think it is something of a shock for these folks. Many get angry. The survivors learn and grow from it – and these are the ones who become much more proactive the next time around, take control and do things differently “the next time.” ~ Melissa R. Bradley MethodTM Educator

OR what if our first birth is based on a friend’s outcome and not based on doing our own exploration and work for what we want?

My friend was due with her first child three months after I was due with my second. I emailed her a lot of documents from my birth classes, talked to her on the phone, bought her a few choice birth books etc. But whenever I tried to help her question some of what she told me about the midwives (medwives) that she was working with, she totally ignored me. We’ve talked about it since, and she basically told me – I knew your birth stories (two unmedicated, un-interfered with, empowering hospital births), and I figured, if you had a good hospital birth I could too. But she didn’t – I *gave* her a lot of information, which was a lot different that my own experience of taking Bradley classes and *seeking* the information I wanted/needed. For whatever reason, she had to have her own “before” birth & then learn/grow from it and have “the next time” happy, respectful, empowering birth (in a freestanding birth center, btw). ~ Christina @ Birthing Your Baby

It is a long, often solo journey a woman will take to find within herself evidence that the decision to birth at home is a good choice and that the burden to prove it is a good choice is not hers to bear.  It is the physician who holds the burden to prove his/her advice and protocol is the safe choice.  That is the crux of medical liability and is wholly relevant in the decision to choose a hospital birth.

In our society, women need to learn the hard way that fairy tales don’t happen, that no one can save you but yourself…and the people around birth should present their offerings (options) without judgement, for women to choose.  Women should be empowered and not controlled by birth professionals/facilities. ~ Randi King in Norman OK

The first birth is the pivotal birth. Every birth experience that follows builds on that one.  Our choices now are choices for the NEXT birth.  The first birth doesn’t have to be either perfect or awful and earth shattering to make us think. We don’t have to choose differently than the first birth; but it’s the first one that gives us a place to begin experiencing not just birth but ourselves as mothers, women, people. We may not all have ground shaking, earth thundering thoughts but we have them.  The experience belongs to us.  We choose what to do with it.  Choosing to do nothing different is still an influenced choice ~ made on that experience.  

Let’s say a woman has a fast hospital birth and rather than choose to just stay home next time she chooses to go early to the hospital, possibly scheduling an elective induction.  This scenario isn’t just welcomed by the state medical examining boards who have lobbied to ensure this is legal and protected under the audacity to call it an ‘option’ when in truth she has not been told home birth is a good option too!  How likely is she to find a physician today who would assure her that her fast labor is not something to fear and that perhaps she should consider a home birth?  That indeed he/she (the medical provider) may even have a home birth practitioner to refer her to?  

We do not foresee the medical world embracing the challenge to be more knowledgeable about normal birth.  The woman with the fast labors and whom the medical community embraces as having the ‘option’ of electing for a scheduled induction is more likely to end up with a cesarean even if she didn’t ‘plan on’ having one.  Then she will find herself in a battle to VBAC for her NEXT birth.  She  may not have the luxury of choosing differently for her NEXT birth.  

What will YOU do to have a first birth that leaves you with few regrets or changes for your NEXT birth?   Why not have the birth of your choosing, rooted in truth and your ability to know yourself and your baby now?

I know my cesarean was really indicated. short short cord, knotted, every time he would begin to descend his heart rate dropped a bit lower. Breech was the only way he wasn’t pulling on it (the surgeon explained this to me in minute detail since he knew my background) which explains why he stayed breech on and off for the last few weeks. I really wanted him to turn head down, and he complied (which fits his personality so far too! so cool… anyway… back to the story). But by complying with my need/desire for a head-down birth, he put himself in a position that pulled on the cord/knot. I saw the knot – I’d call it a double knot… one on top of another… He never did crash, and I never did establish a labor pattern. I just KNEW something was up. So I called in and had the surgery. That was a leap, for sure… to lay myself up on that table without a KNOWN reason. I just knew. Knew it all along really…So yeah. I trust the process more… I had a cesarean with my first baby – 15 years ago – and now again with my 5th – 3 VBACS in between. Seems I’ve come full circle in alot of ways. I trust moms more too – when someone says to me, “something doesn’t feel right” I will NEVER brush that off even for a second. Not even in my head. I don’t think I did it before, but for sure I won’t do it now.   But yeah… it wasn’t a failure, just… I still ***wish*** for my homebirth. Maybe someday.  ~ Kelly

The first birth is ‘herstory’.  It is a myth that women who seek a home birth are willfully putting themselves at risk. Women are fully capable of considering their options and choosing how to care for themselves.  It is not rational to say home birth is never safe; saying so is the product of hysteria.  Protecting choice, not limiting choice, is good, no, GREAT health care.  Tell a friend, tell your state government, tell the White House, the NEXT birth is now.

 

The more a midwife speaks to a mother and spends quality time with her, the more likely a mother is to open up and reveal more of her daily routines and habits that can affect her pregnancy and birth.  For example, the midwife will ask a mother the most basic yet critical questions like what is she eating and follow up with nutritional counseling, a topic in which the midwife owns expertise. She’ll ask her what is occurring in her life today, yesterday, expecting for tomorrow. A mother’s every day peace and stress contributes to her body’s sense of well-being and reaching the point where mother and her body believe it is time now to give birth safely and securely.

The psychology of labor is addressed during the med school L&D rotation by incorporating finding other resources for emotional and mental support.  Subsequently we have a number of practitioners in all fields lacking in bedside manner today, but in birth this aspect has an impact intangible to the practitioner but very real to the mother and her family.  The average obstetrical course of education includes fewer than three credit hours in understanding nutrition.  The focus on prenatal nutrition is only a small portion of the syllabus (do your homework choosing a careprovider!).  The home birth midwife also follows the mother into the immediate postpartum and continues home visits to see how mother and baby function as a unit.

It is the midwife who is better versed in delivering babies in various but normal birth situations.  A breech baby can be birthed safer in the hands of a midwife than a hospital attendant.  She has not let her skills fall behind because medico-legal liability has dictated a breech birth to be enough of a risk as to deem a cesarean to be the required course of action; therefore, she continues to hone both her observational and palpating skills.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), America’s leading organization promoting the benefits of clinical obstetrics in the sterile rooms of trained physicians, has found itself in a dilemma.  The technology and protocols ACOG promotes are the very ones that directly influence our birth statistics negatively.  The birth technology ACOG promotes to prevent or lower risks in birth for both mothers and their babies has not been proven to be beneficial, yet it is used profusely.  Birth in America rarely includes the intimacy of the act that culminated in procreation.  Images of an infant gently caught into its own mother’s arms are so rare that they cause the general public to question the safety of such an event. Debate for and against the licensing of midwifery – and the definition of midwifery itself – is gaining momentum, because statistics for hands off care of normal, natural childbirth are far better than those of managed birth.

In fact, Rebecca Watson of the New Mexico Department of Health has stated, “I sometimes wonder why [we bother compiling statistics on midwives], since their statistics are so much better than everyone else’s.”

While home birth is stereotyped as dangerous because of the lack of medical supervision, it is the lack of that technology and medicine that actually makes birth at home safer than birth in a hospital under today’s protocols.

Studies have shown that once a technology is introduced and mandated, it is difficult to remove it from care practice despite being proven unsafe or unnecessary.  For instance, although the rates involving an episiotomy (cutting the perineum to create a larger opening for the baby to pass through) have dropped drastically since 1980, it is still a common practice.  Ironically, episiotomy rates today are justified as integral to the higher use of vacuum-assisted deliveries or unfounded fears that a baby is stuck because it is a large baby or presenting in a less than optimal position, (posteriors, for example, where a baby faces away from the mother’s back during labor).

America is one of the few nations where birth is managed more with technology than with the hands and eyes of the care provider, but other countries will soon catch up. In a country that boasts technology superior to other developed nations and is not known for undernourishing its citizens, our mothers and babies are faring no better at birth than underdeveloped nations such as Croatia. No improvements have been made in the maternal mortality rate in America since 1982, and  America’s infant mortality rate in the past two decades also has not improved. Our birth technology has increased and the number of routine prenatal screening tests have multiplied since the early 1960s, but our maternal and fetal outcomes have gone progressively backward.

“Despite a significant improvement in the U.S. maternal mortality ratio since the early 1900s, it still represents a substantial and frustrating burden, particularly given the fact that – essentially – no progress has been made in most U.S. states since 1982. Additionally, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has stated that most cases are probably preventable.” states C.T. Lang in a 2008 obstetrics and gynecology report.  Further, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported in 1983 that the maternal mortality rate in the U.S. was 8.0 for every 100,000 live births (Monthly Vital Statistics Report).  In 1993, the rate was 12.0/100,000 live births (CDC).

Among the causal deaths that could be prevented were those that involve both underlying health issues such as poor nutrition and high blood pressure (World Health Organization) as well as those that are physician-caused including infection and hemorrhage.  Bacterium can be introduced first by the mother arriving in an environment where diseases are being treated as well as from infiltrating the natural barriers we have against infection through vaginal exams and, of course, surgical delivery. In addition, there are higher incidences of hemorrhage from forced delivery of the placenta as when a care provider intentionally pulls on an umbilical cord to tear the placenta away from the uterine wall of the mother’s womb. In all instances, normal birth evidence training of the professional birth attendant is critical.

Injuries and deaths related to the physician’s care range from the off-label use of medicine such as Cytotec (also known as Misoprostol) for the inducing of labor as well as the sanctified use of surgical delivery, which gives us embolism, one of the leading causes of maternal mortality and a risk directly associated with cesareans.  Cesarean rates for delivery rose by 46 percent from 1995 to 2006.

Women around the world, the time to look again at the image of women birthing with women versus a medical obstetrical group in normal birth is now. WE can improve global maternal and newborn birth outcomes and experiences. WE know birth. WE know women’s hopes and fears.  A new generation of birth wisdom and experiences is here!

Wishing you a truly happy Mother’s Day secure in the knowledge of your body’s innate wisdom!

Learn more about the wisdom of utilizing your best resource: an Independent Childbirth member led birth education class like Dorene Vaughn’s All Natural Baby!

Visit our comments section (this post) to find some of the most awesome birth wisdom posts our readers have found on the web and to add the ones you’ve found!

One thing we loved about the documentary Orgasmic Birth, is how it complements Business of Being Born’s consumerism awareness and vice versa because the woman herself was the focus.  Her power.  Her ability to birth.  No focus on who is catching the baby.  AND…the births take place in America in the mother’s own time and her space.  A Disney film attempted to show waterbirth with dolphins and took place in scenery meant to be exotic and far away, but took a toll on both the dolphins and the women and families birthing in the name of cinematography in the process instead.  Disney, we don’t need to sell birth in an infomercial, but birth is of global interest.

Practitioners are selling fear of birth.  The truth is birth is simple and we do more harm just by using words to put a fear of the unknown in place rather than the empowerment of experiencing the new.  Birth is not an unknown UNLESS you throw interventions into the mix.  Then you’re on a whole ‘nother flowchart.

I think we, natural childbirth educators and advocates, are accused of “selling” natural childbirth by careproviders annoyed that they’ve lost another customer. 

When birth is allowed to just happen it is not only an experience of wonderment for all in its presence it is also an experience in appreciation for a woman to be “a” woman, one not one of many.  For a baby to be the individual human welcomed, not one of many.

I loved “Kerstin’s Birth Story” which is the birth story of our own Olivia Sporinsky now living in Texas with her husband and family on his military base.  Olivia tells us of her birth experience in Germany where the careproviders believed something definite about American women.  Still, they were open to allowing Olivia to birth her way even though it differed from what they believed to be true about American women and how they birthed.

I recalled Henci Goer during the NIH conference on elective cesarean.  The panel was quick to say “more research is needed”, the typical wishy-washy answer so as not raise the ire of an industry that has a heavy interest in the public perception of cesareans.  However, Henci, in her usual to the point manner, asked, “What are careproviders telling women about labor, birth?”  Her viewpoint being if we only look at “elective” cesarean as a “whatever you’d like” versus talking to women about labor as a healthy and safe process; VBAC labor as one where we support natural labor as the healthiest route even more so; talking to women about how normal it is to have trepidation about natural birth and recommend resources for them to learn more about the birth process, well then, of course you breed more fear of birth.  Careproviders themselves are actually talking themselves into being afraid of the laboring woman as pure risk.

Here’s to you Olivia and Kerstin.  May the international birth community and women around the world know that technology is good to have but do not attach technology as a necessity for American women, for any woman.  America’s maternity care has misplaced faith in technology and other countries need not follow.  There are American women who are not afraid of birth and every day these women are a hands-on lesson for society and practitioners every day.  Humble and wiser is the practitioner who gives the mother her due for a most satisfying labor only she can do.

In January 2005 I found out that I was expecting my 3rd child.  Being stationed in Germany with my husband I was excited about giving birth outside of the US.  I was assigned a German OB and also sought out a midwife.  Home birth was finally an option with my insurance.  The funny thing was that the insurance insisted that I continue to see the OB even though I was seeing a midwife.  I eventually stopped seeing the OB because it was a waste of my time to go to 2 appointments for the exact same thing. 
 
In my 8th month the midwife informed me that due to some legal technicalities she could not attend my birth on the Army base.  It is considered US soil, and there was some question about whether she could lose her license if she attended a birth there.  I would have been the first home birth on the base.  I then returned to the OB who sent me to register at my choice of hospitals.  I chose St Hildegardis-Krankenhaus I would be attended by midwives at the hospital and an OB would only be called in if there were a problem.
 
On September 8th I drove a friend home, about 20 minutes from my home.  On the way back I had a strong contraction.  I thought to myself, “if I have many more like this before I get home I won’t be able to drive”.  I returned home, climbed the 3 flights to my apartment and sat down on the couch.  A couple minutes later I had another contraction that made me jump off of the couch.  I said to my husband that that was the 2nd strong contraction like that I had had.  It was now about 9:45 in the evening.  He asked if we should call the neighbor to come take our other 2 for the night and I said no, it will probably be a while yet.  The first 2 contractions were about 20 minutes apart and the next few were strong, not painful and about 10 minutes apart.  I spent my time sitting on the toilet, the most comfortable position for me, but also a good position since it opened the pelvis.  I prayed that this labor, which felt so different from my 2 previous, would go quickly.  God granted my prayer request.  Around 10:20 or so I said he needed to call the neighbors and let them know he would be bringing the kids over.  When he asked for the number, and wanted me to call, I couldn’t form a complete thought.  I pointed him to the list of emergency numbers to call.  After he carried our second child over, I realized I could not wait for him to come back upstairs to get me.  I gathered my bag, his wallet and the keys and was waiting in the parking lot for him.  He looked at me as if I’d lost my mind, but I knew we needed to leave then.  The normally 26 minute drive took 45 minutes that night, and the car ride through the country to the “big city” was painful.  Every bump in the road hurt. 
 
We arrived at the hospital, around 11:20, and he dropped me at the door and then went to park the car.  I rang the bell for the night watchman (not all German hospitals have “emergency” rooms, we went to a private hospital that handled scheduled procedures and birth), told him in my very broken German that I was in labor.  As he went to get a wheelchair I waved him off and said I couldn’t sit anymore.  We made our way slowly upstairs, pausing every 2 minutes or so for a contraction.  When we arrived in the labor area, I rang the bell and told the midwife I was American.  She returned with an English speaking midwife who watched me through one contraction and said we needed to be in the birth room.  The next words she said shocked me.  She said, “we should call the anesthesiologist, yes?”  I responded with “No, please don’t”  She then said, “you are American, yes?”.  I said that I was but I really preferred to do this without any drugs.  It wasn’t until later that I realized the full implication of what she had asked me.  She asked if they could check to see how far I was dilated, and I agreed, again, curiosity getting the better of me.  I think I was 6 or 7.  I requested that they break my waters, my other 2 had come so quickly after the release.  She grudgingly agreed and did it the German way–no amniohook, just pinched the bag during a contraction and popped it–never again will I request that!  They wanted to get a good read on the baby, so I allowed them to hook up the EFM.  The room (at the hospital) was wonderful.  I had all the tools at my fingertips that I needed.  The midwives then left me to labor quietly, peacefully.  I spent most of my time swaying, doing the belly dance, and chanting “baby out, baby out”.  My husband wonderful as he is, is not a great labor companion.  He kept saying that he wished he could get the baby out.  I didn’t want him to do anything, I just needed to say it.  Suddenly there was a flurry of activity in the room and I realized that they were pulling out the internal monitor.  I couldn’t verbalize that I knew where the baby was, that all was ok with her/him.  There was no way that I was letting them screw that electrode into my baby’s head.  I knew it meant that my 4 hour recovery stay would turn into 24.  All I could say was that I would have 1 more contraction and push.  I climbed on the bed on all fours, had one contraction, rolled over and in a half-sitting position pushed before the midwife knew what was happening.  My husband was frantically ringing for the other midwife to come in.  She ran in just as my baby’s head was born.  They all stood there and stared at me.  After a short time, 2 minutes, she that I needed to push again to birth the body.  I’m not sure if she was concerned that the shoulders were stuck, or what, but when I felt the urge, I birthed the body.  They allowed me to reach down and pick up the baby, who was a girl.  She was born at 12:28 am.  They nestled us skin to skin and covered us with warm blankets.  Then came the next crazy (in my opinion) question:  “did you remember to bring your own formula?”  I pointed at my breasts and said “I have 2 of these and they work great!”  The lights were turned up a bit when they took baby Kerstin across the room to weigh her and do her exams.  They dressed her and brought her back where she happily nursed away.  They continued to bring us warm blankets until about 5:30 when they took me to my room, holding the baby in my bed.  I then had the option to take her to the nursery while I showered.  I shared a room with 2 other women, neither of whom had her baby in the room and both were sleeping.  I showered, got my baby, and ate breakfast.  While I waited for  my husband to come pick us up, I noticed that there were several nurses who kept pausing at our door.  I started listening to their conversations (oh, the joy of understanding a foreign language) and realized they were all talking about me–the American who didn’t have drugs and was breastfeeding.  I also insisted on leaving that morning, 9 hours after her birth, we left for home.  The Germans typically stay for a week until the birth certificate is ready, they leave rested, and prepared to care for a baby. 
 
I finally understood understood why the midwives were so surprised that I refused the drugs.  Most of the American spouses who deliver there demand drugs, the German women don’t.  I started asking all the Germans I knew, they all had home births, or non-medicated hospital births.  It also made me so sad that American women are seen as weak, not able to handle labor.  The Germans don’t see it as painful, just a necessary process to have a baby.  So what if it hurts a little?  They accomplished it.  I’ve often said if I were to have another baby I would hop a flight across the Atlantic if I could not have a home birth.