pregnancy


As a group whose every day bears witness to the entry into this world of many a newborn we enjoy hearing women’s descriptions of all things birth.  We tend to cringe hearing harsh language surrounding birth.  An irritable uterus?  What is that, a belly with angry eyes???

I remember Laura describing her daughter’s entry into the world as one where her cord was “creatively wrapped.”  What a difference it makes to view each birth with wonder, not as a risk.  I believe it is in the documentary by Patchwork Films called “Born In The USA” where Dr. Joanne Armstrong admits hospitals have low tolerance for viewing laboring women as anything but risk.

We spent a good portion of last year bringing awareness to the misleading presentations on technology in birth.  We will continue to do so as new “turf battles” with ACOG arise, but it’s time now to see the beauty of labor and birth as it really exists.  I know many believe “orgasmic birth an old midwive’s tale” or simply too extreme a description for what is otherwise only a reverential experience.  I have to smile to myself and just state the obvious: birth is personal and some take their personal view as the only view and are taken aback when their view isn’t just like someone else’s is.  Perhaps that’s why Ms. Moore fails to mention that Orgasmic Birth also contains the story of a mother who labored and labored and labored.  It wasn’t orgasmic in the sexual sense.  It was sexual as in liberating.  Had this woman labored in a hospital she would have been sectioned.  The only real point of discussion is that whether or not any of us feels she should have been sectioned is a matter of personal choice.  And that’s what we here at Independent Childbirth see as the reason why globally maternal care is so faulty: it does not have choice at the foundation.

Birth is.  Period.  That’s the true beautiful secret of birth.  Each birth is unique as well as being unique to the mother at that moment in time.  When she first birthed she was not the same woman that she is giving birth the following year or years later.  She is not the same woman giving birth two, three, four births later.  None of those babies are the same as the ones before.

When women fail to honor the different choices we each make we tear each other down.  Why else are the mommy wars the fodder of many a journalistic piece?  It makes for entertainment: judging each other for the decision to breastfeed even when it means dealing with people who cannot see breasts as anything other than sexual; judging each other for a mom who wants to both be a mother and have a successful career.

We need more appreciation for the turtle women.  Yes, turtle women.  There are turtle women specific to the birth world but I think turtle women abound in all aspects of our life.  They are the women who support, not criticize, our choices.  It does not mean they agree with every choice we make.  It does mean that they are wise enough to recognize the value of stirring every woman to think about her choices, why she made them and most importantly be confident in her own wisdom to adjust or make different choices because she has learned something new.

“Orgasmic Birth” is scheduled to be reviewed in a segment by ABC’s 20/20 tonight at long last.  Unfortunately it may be viewed as a part of a theme called “extreme mothering.”  Today’s journalism just isn’t journalism unless it’s sensationalist.  Sigh.

No matter.  Turtle women all the way down … enjoy!

ACOG State Legislative Update Year In Review (August 2007)” begins by noting “troubling trends” in state legislation and sets the tone for the bias of this opinion from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).  There are four trends ACOG finds troubling: right to home birth bills are on the rise, more midwives not recognized by medical associations are being licensed by states, midwives appear to have a public advantage and finally that ACOG considers itself on the defensive today.

The facts ACOG provides are clear and succinct in their first two cases, but are opinion laden in the latter.  More home birth bills are being introduced and those that have been in debate for years now are finally passing.  For example, Virginia recently passed legislation protecting women’s rights to birth at home and in 2007 Missouri granted midwives licensure.  It is also true that states are granting Certified Practicing Midwife (CPM) licensure, hands-on training including non-medical skills.  This is not the same training model as the medical path for midwifery recognized by ACOG and the American College of Nurse Midwives.  ACOG does not debate the safety of home birth but rather goes into examining why midwifery and home birth are gaining groundswell support.

 ACOG tells us that midwives have learned how to “work” the legislative system and are now using the same tactics ACOG has used themselves: lobbying and propaganda.  Midwives have been so successful that they have garnered endorsement from the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) for a model to license Certified Practicing Midwives.  ALEC’s endorsement is powerful because it is conservative in nature and therefore, an endorsement renders the CPM licensure model credibility.  ACOG’s illogical stand is, without medical training, midwives are an unsafe choice.

However, ACOG pointedly leaves out the basis for recognizing midwifery: it is not the practice of medicine.  This is critical to understanding the process by which midwifery is recognized and can be protected as a viable option for birth care.  Connecticut is undergoing the struggle to create a definitive line on the issue of whether or not midwifery is practicing medicine.  Almost ten years ago midwife Donna Vedam found herself on trial for practicing medicine.  The courts determined she was, in fact, practicing midwifery and midwifery is not medicine.  Then in 2006 the state’s Medical Examining Board (MEB) found another case to try, midwives who made the right decision, transferring a mother whose birth was not an emergency but should have the medical care her evolving situation might call for available.  The educated decision these midwives, Joan Mershon and Mary Ellen Albini, made in transferring the mother is argued by the MEB as practicing medicine.  There is an irony as midwives finding themselves hounded for providing midwifery care are also persecuted for transferring the mother into appropriate medical care.  The outcome of the birth was a fine healthy baby and mother.  Both mother and father refuse to testify against the midwives.

 ACOG states that midwives have the public advantage of winning support through the use of the buzz words “safety” and “choice.”  Their case – that this advantage is an unfair one – is not fact based.  They argue that home birth is safe in the Netherlands only because everyone lives near a hospital.  There is no evidence in that statement at all.  It only implies that home birth is safe only when it takes place near a hospital.  Their statement is not a case and it is clear they cannot even make the effort to understand what home birth care is.  It is evident that they fear what they do not understand, what is different.  

Further, ACOG also argues that comparisons of home birth and hospital birth cannot be compared because the studies are not scientifically rigorous.  This also ignores the basis for home birth care: birth occurs naturally and organic without active management.  Therefore as each mother-baby pair is unique, they cannot be controlled.

ACOG’s final cited troubling trends is, interestingly, presented last.  It should have been first as it clearly state’s the article’s bias: ACOG is on the defensive.  ACOG is clearly feeling not only outmaneuvered, but also recognizing that they placed themselves in this position.  For example, it is ACOG who made it difficult for hospitals to provide care for women who want birth vaginally after having had a surgical delivery (cesarean) also known as a VBAC (Wagner).  Yet, their position in this paper is that women are seeking out alternatives, home birth with midwives, since their care providers cannot provide VBAC as a birth care option.

ACOG closes the article stating that their position is that legislative support for midwives is not won on merit but rather a sympathetic public and press.  Additionally, ACOG says, it finds itself in a situation where showing up in large numbers when they can give testimony makes them appear to be engaging in a “turf battle” rather than a credible alliance.  This is the plea that they make to find or create alliances with other organizations.  Make no mistake, this is not a light objective to note as some pediatric and newborn service providers have jumped onto ACOG’s wagon.  

This written public statement is clearly an opinion piece reporting facts that are driving ACOG to explore options for defeating midwifery and home birth as a legally protected option for women.  It fails to cite any merits for this position and in fact the “uninformed public” they lament could also be the informed reader’s lament for the uninformed public may not understand that denying American women access to home birth is a clear violation of every American citizen’s right to privacy and right to choose what care or actions are taken upon their bodies.

What did 2008 bring us at Independent Childbirth?  Many, many, natural, spontaneous unmedicated labor and birth over an intact perineum taking places in homes, birth centers and a few hospitals under the expert care and guidance of independent midwives and enlightened midwifery/ob practices.

America is pretty unique in the type of childbirth prep our society recognizes.  Did you know in many countries, many cultures our way of birth prep is quite odd: all gather and sit in a hospital provided room or have a workbook and sit in a classroom style?  

Watch our birth link video again.  We are changing birth prep today!  We are centered on YOU.  You are the real woman, real options, real birth link!  Tell us about your birth link and take our survey!

Click Here to take survey

Traditionally women have learned about birth through stories passed on from their mothers or other female relatives.  Sounds great but there are women for whom their mothers are uncomfortable telling their birth story or their mother is a Twilight Sleep mom or had some other birth experience that rendered her unable to recall many details of her birth experience.  Today, we have more and more women exploring all of their birth care options and birth stories range from birthing a baby under the moonlight because “I wasn’t sure I wanted to be at the hospital and fight the docs who didn’t agree with natural childbirth” to “the doc and I high-fived each other because this was his first time catching a baby with mom on her hands and knees” to “my midwife guided my hands into the water to catch my daughter.”

So, who’s your birth link?

The ICAN offer below is a genuine offer and has been posted through VBACtivism, an organized yahoo support group.  It is our understanding that you should contact the group below if you are seeking help protecting your access to VBAC health care because you have been denied the right to VBAC.  You will be asked to provide information pertinent to your situation and a determination will be made as to whether or not you have a case.  Please, if you’re thinking about contacting the email below, do it!  Just the fact that you are thinking about it is enough to warrant following through.  You and your baby deserve to exercise your rights to choose your health care for yourself.  Write a letter to your careprovider first but don’t wait for a response that may never come, learn more now!

I’m a lawyer with the Northwest Women’s Law Center in Seattle.  I’m investigating possible legal responses to bans on vaginal birth after cesarean at hospitals in the northwest states – Alaska, Idaho, Montana,Washington and Oregon.  If you are currently pregnant and want to have a VBAC, but are facing a hospital policy that would require you to have a c-section regardless of whether you want it and whether it is medically necessary, and are willing to consider working with a lawyer on this, we’d like to talk with you.  Please email us at vbacbanhelp@ican-online.org.  Our services will be provided free of charge.  


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